brookline booksmith

Events What We're Reading Giftsmith Kidsmith Used Book Cellar Audiobooks

The Truth About Blind Dates

by Gwen

This February we brought back our Blind Date with a Book display. For those of you who have never blind dated a book, here’s how it works - we hand-picked some of our favorite books, wrapped them up, and tossed them into the dating ring.  Potential daters perused the classified ads, took a chance on love, and took home a great book. For the curious (and skeptical) we’ve revealed some of our more mysterious picks.


full-img


Can you guess what title is responsible for this ad?


full-img


Floating Like the Dead by Yasuko Thanh is a collection of short stories with a deep bite. 

In this sharply observed and erotically charged debut collection, Journey Prize-winner Yasuko Thanh immerses us in the lives of people on the knife edge of desire and regret, hungry for change yet still yearning for a place to call home, if only for a little while. – jacket copy, Emblem Editions


full-img


full-img


We wanted to represent all kinds of love with our project.  Here is a book that focuses on the kind of love that comes with great friendship…


full-img


Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings is a novel of friendship and growing up. 

“The Interestings” is warm, all-American and acutely perceptive about the feelings and motivations of its characters, male and female, young and old, gay and straight; but it’s also stealthily, unassumingly and undeniably a novel of ideas. – New York Times Book Review

As the characters grow and change so do their ambitions.  And while the world beyond summer camp is difficult and full of constant shifts this novel reminds us that having good friends can make all the difference.


full-img


Think you can guess what title this is? 


full-img


Tipping the Velvet, Sarah Waters’ debut novel published in 1999, has become a staple in the LGBTQ literary canon.  Set in Victorian England the reader follows a young woman as she develops her identity and explores her sexuality. 


full-img


Kirkus’ April 2000 review describes the success of the novel and its themes-

Waters’s debut offers terrific entertainment: swiftly paced, crammed with colorful depictions of 1890s London and vividly sketched Dickensian supporting characters (Nancy’s kindly parents recall the genial fisherfolk of David Copperfield), pulsating with highly charged (and explicitly presented) erotic heat.


full-img


Sometimes finding love is really, really hard.  If only there was an equation that could fit two together perfectly…


full-img


The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion is a heartfelt and hilarious look at what it takes to find love – and what can get in the way.  NPR’s review of The Rosie Project  just gets it –

It’s an utterly winning screwball comedy about a brilliant, emotionally challenged geneticist who’s determined to find a suitable wife with the help of a carefully designed questionnaire, and the patently unsuitable woman who keeps distracting him from his search. If you’re looking for sparkling entertainment along the lines of Where’d You Go Bernadette and When Harry Met Sally, The Rosie Project is this season’s fix.


full-img


Finally, can you identify which excellent novel is hidden here?



full-img


The Incarnations by Susan Barker is a love story that spans the ages.  Barker is a native Londoner of Malaysian descent.  Her work is both fascinating and heartbreaking.  In The Incarnations The protagonist lives comfortably in his routine until a secret admirer shakes things up.


full-img


A very poignant novel with a sharp focus on the span of Chinese history and its implications.  Both exciting and devastating Susan Barker’s novel is a whirlwind.  The New York Times reviewed her book here.

What are some of your favorite books on love?

Join our mailing list to get b-mail, our weekly newsletter