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Helen Benedict and Eyad Awwadawnan

Helen Benedict and Eyad Awwadawnan

Saturday, October 22, 2022 - 12:00PM ET
Event Location: 
Online

This event will take place virtually on Zoom. Click the button above to register.

Join the Transnational Literature Series at Brookline Booksmith for a virtual event with Helen Benedict and Eyad Awwadawnan to discuss and celebrate the release of their new book Map of Hope and Sorrow: Stories of Refugees Trapped in Greece.

Helen Benedict, award-winning British-American professor of journalism at Columbia University, teams up with Syrian writer and refugee, Eyad Awwadawnan, to present the stories of five refugees who have endured long and dangerous journeys from the Middle East and Africa to Greece. 

Hasan, Asmahan, Evans, Mursal and Calvin each tell their story, tracing the trajectory of their lives from homes and families in Afghanistan, Syria, Nigeria and Cameroon to the brutal refugee camps, where they are trapped in a strange and hostile world.

These are compelling, first-person stories of resilience, suffering and hope, told in a depth rarely seen in nonfiction. The people in this book tell their stories in their own words, retaining control and dignity, while revealing intimate and heartfelt scenes from their lives.

Helen Benedict  is a recipient of the 2021 PEN Jean Stein Grant for Literary Oral History and the Ida B. Wells Award for Bravery in Journalism. She is the author of 13 books, including the award-winning The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women at War Serving in Iraq, and a play The Lonely Soldier Monologues. Her writing inspired both a class action suit against the Pentagon on behalf of people sexually assaulted in the military and the 2012 Oscar-nominated documentary, The Invisible War. She is a novelist and Professor of Journalism at Columbia University, New York.

Eyad Awwadawnan formerly a law student from Damascus, Syria, is a writer and poet currently living as an asylum-seeker in Reykjavik, Iceland. During his four years in Greece, he worked as a cultural mediator, translator and interpreter for various NGOs. He also published a featured article in Slate Magazine detailing his escape from Syria.