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Dariel Suarez in conversation with Shuchi Saraswat

A Kind of Solitude

Set in Cuba, largely after the fall of the Soviet Union, the eleven stories in A Kind of Solitude (Willow Springs Books) explore themes of isolation and preservation in the face of widespread poverty and sociopolitical oppression. From a chronically ill santero refusing medical care to a female-fronted heavy-metal band risking it all to emerge from Havana’s underground, Dariel Suarez, in his daring debut, portrays the harsh reality, inherent humor, and resilient heart of a people whose stories should be known.  »

Dariel Suarez was born and raised in Havana, Cuba. He immigrated to the United States with his family in 1997, during the island’s economic crisis known as The Special Period. He is the author of the novel The Playwright’s House (forthcoming, Red Hen Press) and the story collection A Kind of Solitude (Willow Springs Books), winner of the 2017 Spokane Prize for Short Fiction. Dariel is an inaugural City of Boston Artist Fellow and the Director of Core Programs and Faculty at GrubStreet, the country’s largest and leading independent creative writing center. He earned his M.F.A. in Fiction at Boston University and now resides in the Boston area with his wife and daughter.

Shuchi Saraswat’s work has appeared in Ecotone, Tin House online, Literary Hub, Women’s Review of Books, among others. Her essay “The Journey Home” received a special mention in Pushcart XLII 2018 and will be anthologized in Trespass: Ecotone Essayists Beyond the Boundaries of Place, Identity, and Feminism, published by Lookout Books in Spring 2019. She is the creator and curator of the Transnational Literature Series at Brookline Booksmith.

*Due to unforeseen circumstances Laura van den Berg will be unable to join us for this event. Dariel will now be in conversation with Transnational Series curator Shuchi Saraswat.

Leila Slimani in conversation with Mona Awad

Adèle

Leila Slimani will appear in conversation with novelist Mona Awad.

Adèle appears to have the perfect life: She is a successful journalist in Paris who lives in a beautiful apartment with her surgeon husband and their young son. But underneath the surface, she is bored–and consumed by an insatiable need for sex. Driven less by pleasure than compulsion, Adèle organizes her day around her extramarital affairs, arriving late to work and lying to her husband about where she’s been, until she becomes ensnared in a trap of her own making. Suspenseful, erotic, and electrically charged, Adèle is a captivating exploration of addiction, sexuality, and one woman’s quest to feel alive.

Leila Slimani is the bestselling author of The Perfect Nanny. A journalist and frequent commentator on women’s and human rights, she is French president Emmanuel Macron’s personal representative for the promotion of the French language and culture. Born in Rabat, Morocco, in 1981, she now lives in Paris with her French husband and their two young children.

Jacob Kramer

Noodlephant

Do you love picture books? Join us in our children’s section with special storytime guest Jacob Kramer!

Famous for her pasta parties, Noodlephant is shocked when the law-loving kangaroos decide noodles are only for them. A zany tale full of pasta puns, friendship, and one Phantastic Noodler, Noodlephant, written by Jacob Kramer and illustrated by K-Fai Steele, explores a community’s response to injustice.

Jacob Kramer grew up in Providence, RI and studied film-making and writing at Harvard. Like Noodlephant, he loves hunting for mushrooms, eating noodles, and organizing with friends in pursuit of justice. He lives in Somerville, MA, where he is an Arts Council Fellow.

Elizabeth Flock in conversation with Min Jin Lee

The Heart is a Shifting Sea

Elizabeth Flock has observed the evolving state of India from inside Mumbai, its largest metropolis. She spent close to a decade getting to know these couples—listening to their stories and living in their homes, where she was privy to countless moments of marital joy, inevitable frustration, dramatic upheaval, and whispered confessions and secrets. The result is a phenomenal feat of reportage that is both an enthralling portrait of a nation in the midst of transition and an unforgettable look at the universal mysteries of love and marriage that connect us all.

Elizabeth Flock is a reporter for PBS NewsHour. She began her career at Forbes India magazine, where she spent two years as a features reporter in Mumbai, and has worked for U.S. News & World Report and the Washington Post. She has also written for major outlets, including the New York Times, the Atlantic, Al Jazeera, Hindustan Times, and The Hindu. She lives in Washington, DC. The Heart Is a Shifting Sea is her first book.

Sándor Jászberényi in conversation with William Pierce

The Most Beautiful Night of the Soul: More Stories from the Middle East and Beyond

Set mostly in contemporary Cairo and Iraq, as well as Israel, London, and Hungary, these twelve short stories are a staggering follow-up to those in the acclaimed collection The Devil Is a Black Dog by leading Hungarian writer/photojournalist Sándor Jászberényi. Told from the perspective of Cairo-based European war correspondent Daniel Marosh, The Most Beautiful Night of the Soul is, above all, about a journalist examining some of today’s most pressing Middle East conflicts and the lives of others even while forced to question his own assumptions and haunted by his own demons.  »

Sándor Jászberényi is a Hungarian writer and Middle East correspondent who has covered the Darfur crisis, the revolutions in Egypt and Libya, the Gaza War, and the Huthi uprising in Yemen, and has interviewed several armed Islamist groups. A photojournalist for the Egypt Independent and Hungarian newspapers, he currently lives in Cairo, Egypt. Born in 1980 in Sopron, Hungary, he studied literature, philosophy, and Arabic at ELTE university in Budapest. His stories have been published in all the major Hungarian literary magazines and in English in the Brooklyn RailPilvax, and BODY Literature. The release of his first collection of short stories, Az ördög egy fekete kutya (The Devil is a Black Dog), in late 2013–both in Hungary (Kalligram) and Italy (Anfora Editore)–was treated with much fanfare in his native land; for it marked the arrival of a distinctive new voice in Hungarian letters, one whose credible focus on timely international themes and settings carries the potential for a broad international readership.

William Pierce is the author of Reality Hunger: On Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle (Arrowsmith Press, 2016). His fiction and essays have appeared in Granta, Ecotone, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. He is senior editor of the literary and cultural magazine AGNI.

S.E. Grove in conversation with Gregory Scott Katsoulis

The Waning Age

S.E. Grove will appear in conversation with Gregory Scott Katsoulis, author of All Rights Reserved and Access Restricted.

The time is now. The place is San Francisco. The world is filled with adults devoid of emotion and children who lose their feelings–who “wane”–when they reach their teens.

Natalia Peña has already waned. So why does she love her little brother with such ferocity that, when he’s kidnapped by a Big Brother-esque corporation, she’ll do anything to get him back?

S. E. Grove is the bestselling author of The Glass Sentence, a historian, and a world traveler. She spends most of her time reading about the early modern Spanish empire, writing about invented empires, and residing in Boston. Follow S. E. Grove on Twitter @segrovebooks.

Sam Lipsyte

Hark

In an America convulsed by political upheaval, cultural discord, environmental collapse, and spiritual confusion, many folks are searching for peace, salvation, and—perhaps most immediately—just a little damn focus. Enter Hark Morner, an unwitting guru whose technique of “Mental Archery”—a combination of mindfulness, mythology, fake history, yoga, and, well, archery—is set to captivate the masses and raise him to near-messiah status. It’s a role he never asked for, and one he is woefully underprepared to take on. But his inner-circle of modern pilgrims have other plans, as do some suddenly powerful fringe players, including a renegade Ivy League ethicist, a gentle Swedish kidnapper, a crossbow-hunting veteran of jungle drug wars, a social media tycoon with an empire on the skids, and a mysteriously influential (but undeniably slimy) catfish.  »
Sam Lipsyte is the author of the story collections Venus Drive (named one of the top twenty-five books of its year by the Voice Literary Supplement) and The Fun Parts and four novels: HarkThe AskThe Subject Steve, and Home Land, which was a New York Times Notable Book and received the first annual Believer Book Award. He is also the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship. He lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University.

Briallen Hopper in conversation with Katherine Stewart

Hard to Love: Essays and Confessions

Briallen Hopper’s Hard to Love honors the categories of loves and relationships beyond marriage, the ones that are often treated as invisible or seen as secondary–friendships, kinship with adult siblings, care teams that form in times of illness, or various alternative family formations. She also values difficult and amorphous loves like loving a challenging job or inanimate objects that can’t love you back. She draws from personal experience, sharing stories about her loving but combative family, the fiercely independent Emerson scholar who pushed her away, and the friends who have become her invented or found family; pop culture touchstones like the Women’s March, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars, and the timeless series Cheers; and the work of writers like Joan Didion, Gwendolyn Brooks, Flannery O’Connor, and Herman Melville (Moby-Dick like you’ve never seen it!).

Briallen Hopper writes about pop culture, religion, politics, friends, family, and herself for New York Magazine, Los Angeles Review of Books, the New Republic, the New Inquiry, Avidly, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Killing the Buddha, among many others. Her essays have been cited or recommended by sources like the New York Times, the Rumpus, Flavorwire, Longreads.com, and Slate. She has a PhD in American literature from Princeton and teaches writing at Yale.

Michael Levin

New York Times bestselling author Michael Levin will write an entire novel in 12 hours (9AM-9PM–from open to close!) to raise funds for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s Boston Marathon team. Brookline Booksmith customers can add a plot twist, location, character name, or anything else to the novel, in exchange for a donation to Levin’s run.

Michael is an accomplished ghostwriter with more than 700 titles to his name over 25 years. Readers will be able to view the novel as it’s written at the store or online at Levin’s website, MichaelLevinWrites.com/Booksmith.

Valeria Luiselli in conversation with Christopher Lydon

Lost Children Archive

Valeria will be in conversation with Christopher Lydon, the host of WBUR’s Radio Open Source.

From the two-time NBCC Finalist, an emotionally resonant, fiercely imaginative new novel about a family whose road trip across America collides with an immigration crisis at the southwestern border - an indelible journey told with breathtaking imagery, spare lyricism, and profound humanity.

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney’s, among other publications, and has been translated into more than twenty languages.

Tina Cassidy

Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait?: Alice Paul, Woodrow Wilson, and the Fight for the Right to Vote

An eye-opening, inspiring, and timely account of the complex relationship between notable suffragist Alice Paul and President Woodrow Wilson in Alice’s fight for women’s equality. From solitary confinement, hunger strikes, and mental institutions to sitting right across from President Wilson, Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait? reveals the inspiring, near-death journey it took, spearheaded in no small part by Paul’s leadership, to grant women the right to vote in America.

Tina Cassidy is the executive vice president and chief content officer at the public relations and social content firm InkHouse and also a board member at the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. She has written two previous nonfiction books, Birth: The Surprising History of How We Are Born and Jackie After O: One Remarkable Year When Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Defied Expectations and Rediscovered her Dreams. Previously, Tina was a journalist at The Boston Globe, where she covered politics, sports, fashion, and business.

Amber Tamblyn

Era of Ignition

Amber Tamblyn will appear at Coolidge Corner Theatre from 6:00-7:00pm (ticket required) to discuss her new memoir, Era of Ignition. A book signing across the street at Brookline Booksmith will follow her talk.

Through her fierce op-eds and tireless work as one of the founders of the Time’s Up organization, Amber has emerged as a bold, outspoken, and respected advocate for women’s rights. In Era of Ignition, she addresses gender inequality and the judgment paradigm, misogyny and discrimination, trauma and the veiled complexities of consent, white feminism and pay parity, reproductive rights and sexual assault–all told through the very personal lens of her own experiences, as well as those of her Sisters in Solidarity. At once an intimate meditation and public reckoning, Era of Ignition is a galvanizing feminist manifesto that is required reading for everyone attempting to understand the world we live in and help change it for the better.

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Amber Tamblyn is an author, actor, and director. She’s been nominated for an Emmy, Golden Globe, and Independent Spirit Award for her work in television and film, including House M.D. and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. Most recently, she wrote and directed the feature film Paint It Black. She is the author of three books of poetry, including the critically acclaimed bestseller Dark Sparkler, and a novel, Any Man, as well as a contributing writer for the New York Times.

Brookline Booksmith Book Club

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Discussing The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris.

The Brookline Booksmith Book Club meets downstairs at 7:30pm. To contact our moderator, email bookclub@brooklinebooksmith.com.

Diana Kuan

Red Hot Kitchen: Classic Asian Chili Sauces from Scratch and Delicious Dishes to Make With Them

In this completely unique Asian cookbook, culinary instructor and trained chef Diana Kuan offers a flavorful education in the art of cooking with homemade Asian hot sauces. From Thai Sriracha to Indonesian sambal to Korean gochujang and other fiery favorites, Asian chili sauces have become staples in restaurants and homes across America. They add a palate-pleasing subtle kick or a scorching burn to the stir-fries, appetizers, and noodle dishes so many people love. But until now, these tantalizing flavors haven’t been easy to recreate at home with fresh, all-natural ingredients.

Diana Kuan is a food writer and photographer based in Brooklyn. She is the author of The Chinese Takeout Cookbook, on Chinese food and culture in America. Her work has also appeared in Food & Wine, Time Out New York, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and Epicurious. In addition to writing and photography, Diana has taught cooking classes for the past ten years in both Beijing and New York. Her favorite foods are dumplings, ramen, and tacos, usually with hot sauce on the side.

Matti Friedman

Spies of No Country: Secret Lives at the Birth of Israel

Award-winning writer Matti Friedman’s tale of Israel’s first spies has all the tropes of an espionage novel, including duplicity, betrayal, disguise, clandestine meetings, the bluff, and the double bluff - but it’s all true.

Spies of No Country is about the slippery identities of four young spies, but it’s also about Israel’s own complicated and fascinating identity. Israel sees itself and presents itself as a Western nation, when in fact more than half the country has Middle Eastern roots and traditions, like the spies of this story. And, according to Friedman, that goes a long way toward explaining the life and politics of the country, and why it often baffles the West.

Matti Friedman’s 2016 book Pumpkinflowers was chosen as a New York Times Notable Book. It was selected as one of the year’s best by Booklist, Mother Jones, Foreign Affairs, the National Post, and the Globe and Mail. His first book, The Aleppo Codex, won the 2014 Sami Rohr Prize, the ALA’s Sophie Brody Medal, and the Canadian Jewish Book Award for history. 

J. R. Krause

Dragon Night

Georgie is afraid of the night. It’s too dark with the lights off. Too quiet with everyone asleep. And being alone makes everything worse. The dragon is afraid of the knight. After all, the knight carries a heavy sword, and he always wants to fight. The dragon knows just what to do to help Georgie overcome his fear, and the two set off on a unforgettable magical adventure. But when the morning comes, the dragon is still afraid of the knight. How can Georgie help his friend? With kindness and empathy–and a little creativity–maybe Georgie can work some magic of his own.

J. R. Krause is an award-winning animator and designer. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, he has worked on many television shows, including The Simpsons and Futurama. He lives in Southern California with his family. To learn more, visit jrkrause.com.

Small Press Book Club

The Collected Schizophrenias

Discussing The Collected Schizophrenias by Esmé Weijun Wang.

Read something off the beaten path! Our Small Press Book Club will meet to discuss a book from an independent publisher. To contact our moderator, email smallpress@brooklinebooksmith.com

An intimate, moving book written with the immediacy and directness of one who still struggles with the effects of mental and chronic illness, The Collected Schizophrenias cuts right to the core. Schizophrenia is not a single unifying diagnosis, and Esmé Weijun Wang writes not just to her fellow members of the “collected schizophrenias” but to those who wish to understand it as well. Opening with the journey toward her diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, Wang discusses the medical community’s own disagreement about labels and procedures for diagnosing those with mental illness, and then follows an arc that examines the manifestations of schizophrenia in her life. In essays that range from using fashion to present as high-functioning to the depths of a rare form of psychosis, and from the failures of the higher education system and the dangers of institutionalization to the complexity of compounding factors such as PTSD and Lyme disease, Wang’s analytical eye, honed as a former lab researcher at Stanford, allows her to balance research with personal narrative. An essay collection of undeniable power, The Collected Schizophrenias dispels misconceptions and provides insight into a condition long misunderstood.

T Kira Madden with Ursula Villarreal-Moura and Che Yeun

Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls

Acclaimed literary essayist T Kira Madden’s raw and redemptive debut memoir is about coming of age and reckoning with desire as a queer, biracial teenager amidst the fierce contradictions of Boca Raton, Florida, a place where she found cult-like privilege, shocking racial disparities, rampant white-collar crime, and powerfully destructive standards of beauty hiding in plain sight.

T Kira Madden is an APIA writer, photographer, and amateur magician. She is the founding editor-in-chief of No Tokens, and facilitates writing workshops for homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals. She lives in New York City and teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

Ursula Villarreal-Moura received her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and was a VONA/Voices fellow. Her stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in numerous magazines including Tin House, Catapult, Prairie Schooner,Washington Square, Nashville Review, Hobart,Bennington Review, WhiskeyPaper, Wigleaf Top 50, and LUMINA.

Che Yeun is a fiction writer whose work has been featured in The Kenyon Review Online and Virginia Quarterly among others, and his work has been nominated twice for The Pushcart Prize. He is currently finalizing a collection of short stories, with generous support from The Hedgebrook Foundation, Jiwar Barcelona, Taipei Artist Village, Lighthouse Writers Workshop, and The Sewanee Writers Conference.

Helen Oyeyemi & G. Willow Wilson

Gingerbread

The Bird King

Join us at Coolidge Corner Theatre for an evening of fantastic fiction! Helen Oyeyemi (Gingerbread) and G. Willow Wilson (The Bird King) will discuss their new books, in conversation with author and editor Kelly Link.  »

GINGERBREAD
Perdita Lee may appear to be your average British schoolgirl; Harriet Lee may seem just a working mother trying to penetrate the school social hierarchy; but there are signs that they might not be as normal as they think they are. For one thing, they share a gold-painted, seventh-floor walk-up apartment with some surprisingly verbal vegetation. And then there’s the gingerbread they make. As the book follows the Lees through encounters with jealousy, ambition, family grudges, work, wealth, and real estate, gingerbread seems to be the one thing that reliably holds a constant value. Endlessly surprising and satisfying, written with Helen Oyeyemi’s inimitable style and imagination, it is a true feast for the reader.****

Helen Oyeyemi is the author of the story collection What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, along with five novels– most recently Boy, Snow, Bird, which was a finalist for the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She received a 2010 Somerset Maugham Award and a 2012 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. In 2013, she was named one of Granta’s Best Young British Novelists.

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*THE BIRD KING
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A stunning new novel tells the story of Fatima, a concubine in the royal court of Granada, and her dearest friend, Hassan the palace mapmaker. Hassan has a secret–he can draw maps of places he’s never seen and bend the shape of reality. When representatives of the newly formed Spanish monarchy arrive to negotiate the sultan’s surrender, Fatima befriends one of the women, not realizing that she will see Hassan’s gift as sorcery and a threat to Christian Spanish rule. With their freedoms at stake, what will Fatima risk to save Hassan and escape the palace walls?

G. Willow Wilson is the author of the critically acclaimed novel, Alif the Unseen, which won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel in 2013; the memoir, The Butterfly Mosque; the graphic novels Cairo, Air, and Vixen; and the celebrated comic book series Ms. Marvel.

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Kelly Link is the author of three collections of short stories, Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, and Pretty Monsters. Her short stories have won the Nebula, Hugo, Locus, and World Fantasy Awards. She and her husband, Gavin J. Grant, run Small Beer Press.

Erica Feldmann

HausMagick: Transform Your Home with Witchcraft

Harness the power of magic to create a beautiful, healing living space with this unique illustrated guide from the founder of HausWitch, the popular Salem, Massachusetts, store and online lifestyle brand.

Anyone looking to put together their ideal home—full of beauty, comfort, protection, and positive energy—will gravitate to HausMagick, a simple and striking modern handbook for using witchcraft to bring divine wellbeing into every dwelling.

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Owner and founder of HausWitch, ERICA FELDMANN has been using intuition to heal spaces from a very young age. A Chicago native, Feldmann moved to Salem, MA, in 2010 to study witches and the sacred feminine in the Gender and Cultural Studies graduate program at Simmons College. The knowledge she gained there, combined with her innate talents for interiors, came together to form HausWitch, a company devoted to helping people heal their spaces and love their homes.

Carolyn Forché in conversation with Askold Melnyczuk

What You Have Heard Is True: A Memoir of Witness and Resistance

What You Have Heard is True is a devastating, lyrical, and visionary memoir about a young woman’s brave choice to engage with horror in order to help others. Written by one of the most gifted poets of her generation, this is the story of a woman’s radical act of empathy, and her fateful encounter with an intriguing man who changes the course of her life.  »

Carolyn Forché is an American poet, editor, translator, and activist. Her books of poetry are Blue HourThe Angel of HistoryThe Country Between Us, and Gathering the Tribes. In 2013, Forché received the Academy of American Poets Fellowship given for distinguished poetic achievement. In 2017, she became one of the first two poets to receive the Windham-Campbell Prize. She is a University Professor at Georgetown University. Forché lives in Maryland with her husband, the photographer Harry Mattison.

Askold Melnyczuk is a writer, editor, translator, and professor. He is the author of four books and has published essays, reviews, poetry, and translations in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Glimmer Train, The Harvard Review, and elsewhere. He founded AGNI magazine in 1972 and in 2001 received the Magid Award from PEN which described AGNI as “one of America’s, and the world’s, most significant literary journals.” He has taught at Harvard University and currently teaches at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Transnational Book Club

An Unnecessary Woman

The Transnational Literature Book Club focuses on books concerned with migration, displacement, and exile, with particular emphasis on works in translation. To contact our moderator, email brad@brooklinebooksmith.com.  »
An Unnecessary Woman is a breathtaking portrait of one reclusive woman’s late-life crisis, which garnered a wave of rave reviews and love letters to Alameddine’s cranky yet charming septuagenarian protagonist, Aaliya, a character you “can’t help but love” (NPR). Aaliya’s insightful musings on literature, philosophy, and art are invaded by memories of the Lebanese Civil War and her volatile past. As she tries to overcome her aging body and spontaneous emotional upwellings, Aaliya is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left. Here, the gifted Rabih Alameddine has given us a nuanced rendering of one woman’s life in the Middle East and an enduring ode to literature and its power to define who we are.

Cori McCarthy & Amy Rose Capetta in conversation with Malinda Lo

Once & Future

When Ari crash-lands on Old Earth and pulls a magic sword from its ancient resting place, she is revealed to be the newest reincarnation of King Arthur. Together with Merlin, who has aged backwards through the centuries into a teenager, she must break the curse that keeps Arthur coming back. Their quest? Defeat the cruel, oppressive government and bring peace and equality to all humankind.

Cori McCarthy is the author of four young adult books, including BREAKING SKY, which received multiple starred reviews and is in development to become a film by Sony Pictures, and a forthcoming nonfiction picture book.

Amy Rose Capetta is the author of several YA novels, including THE BRILLIANT DEATH. She is the co-founder of the Rainbow Boxes initiative, which sent LGBTQIAP fiction to readers in all 50 states, and the Rainbow Writers Workshop, which helps find and develop exciting new voices.

Malinda Lo is the author of the young adult novels Ash, Huntress, Adaptation, and Inheritance. She has been a three-time finalist for the Lambda Literary Award.

Laurie Katz

Liar Laurie: Breaking the Silence on Sexual Assault

When Laurie went to college in Chicago, she was all set to embark on a new life. But on the third weekend of her freshman year, Laurie was raped. And everything changed. In the aftermath, Laurie reached out for help. But she didn’t get any. Friends didn’t believe her. The dean didn’t support her. Laurie had to fight not just for justice but for understanding. For validation. Laurie could have dropped out of college, she could have given up, but she carried on. And not even seeing her attacker on campus could stop her.  »

Laurie’s story is an all-too familiar account of how the fight for justice is repeated in campuses and courtrooms around the world. Laurie never got the justice she deserved. But she got something else - a resolute sense of her own self, and her own strength. Laurie’s #MeToo story is a testament to the strength and courage of people who have been wronged, but never stop fighting back.

Laurie Katz is an elementary teacher from Boston, Massachusetts who spent her undergraduate years studying early childhood education, then completed a Master’s in Education. She is passionate about ending sexual assault on college campuses and elsewhere, and helping to expand the conversation on helpful services for survivors. She is now ready to share her own story and help others in the process.

Adam Abramowitz

A Town Called Malice

Boston’s fastest-talking, baddest bike messenger Zesty Meyers is back in town…Bosstown.

When a rock and roll legend suspected of murdering his girlfriend reappears after thirty years on the run, Zesty is once again haunted by his family’s dark past and the mounting evidence that his father, Boston’s former Poker King, has long been dealing from the bottom of the deck. From shady bars to college campus underground poker leagues, Zesty’s speeding toward trouble, desperately trying to map out a future in a town where stop signs are optional, signaling is for the weak and Karma lurks around every corner with payback on its mind.

Adam Abramowitz grew up in Allston and Boston’s South End working as a courier, bartender, doorman, and long-time mover at Nick’s Cheap and Friendly Moving Company. A graduate of UMass Boston, Adam currently teaches in Mount Vernon, New York and is the author of Bosstown.

An Evening of Poetry with Zeina Hashem Beck, George Abraham, and Jess Rizkallah

Louder Than Hearts

The Specimen's Apology

the magic my body becomes

Join us for an evening of poetry with three writers whose work explores the breadth and depth of the Arab experience.

Zeina Hashem Beck is a Lebanese poet. Her second full-length collection, Louder than Hearts, won the 2016 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize. She’s also the author of two chapbooks: 3arabi Song, winner of the 2016 Rattle Chapbook Prize, and There Was and How Much There Was, a 2016 Laureate’s Choice, selected by Carol Ann Duffy. Her first book, To Live in Autumn, won the 2013 Backwaters Prize. Her work has appeared in Ploughshares, Poetry, the Academy of American Poets, Poetry London, and World Literature Today, among others. Her poem, “Maqam,” won Poetry Magazine’s 2017 Frederick Bock Prize. She lives in Dubai, where she has founded the poetry collective PUNCH.

George Abraham (they/he) is a Palestinian-American poet and Bioengineering PhD candidate at Harvard University. They are the author of Birthright (Button Poetry, 2020), as well as two chapbooks: the specimen’s apology (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2019) and al youm (TAR, 2017). They are a Kundiman, Watering Hole, and Poetry Incubator fellow, and winner of the 2018 Cosmonauts Avenue Poetry Prize. Their poetry and nonfiction have appeared or is forthcoming online with The Paris Review, Tin House, LitHub, Boston Review, The Rumpus, and in anthologies such as Bettering American Poetry and Nepantla.

Jess Rizkallah is a Lebanese-American writer and illustrator. She is an NYU MFA graduate, a Kundiman fellow, and editor-in-chief at pizza pi press. Her full-length collection THE MAGIC MY BODY BECOMES was a finalist for The Believer Poetry Award and won the 2017 Etel Adnan Poetry Prize as awarded by the Radius of Arab-American Writers and University of Arkansas Press.

Translating Duanwad Pimwana: Translator Mui Poopoksakul in conversation with Nina MacLaughlin

Bright

Arid Dreams

Duanwad Pimwana is a major voice in contemporary Thai literature. She won Southeast Asia’s most prestigious literary prize—the S.E.A. Write Award——in 2003 for her novel Bright, and she is also the recipient of awards from PEN International Thailand and others. Acclaimed for her subtle fusing magic realism with Thai urban culture, she has written nine books, and for the first time two of her books will be published in the US in English translation. Join us for a conversation with Duanwad’s Thai to English translator, Mui Pooposakul, who will discuss Duanwad’s work in the context of contemporary Thai literature.  »

Mui Poopoksakul is one of the leading translators of Thai literature into English. She guest-edited an issue of Words Without Borders on Thai literature, and she is also the recipient of the English PEN Translates Award and was named one of the 20 leading translators under 40 by The Culture Trip. She translated Duanwad Pimwana’s novel Bright (Two Lines Press, 2019) the first translated novel by a Thai woman to ever be published in the US, and the collection of short stories Arid Dreams (Feminist Press, 2019).

Nina MacLaughlin is the author of Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter (W.W. Norton), and Wake, Siren, a retelling of Ovid’s Metamorphoses from the perspectives of the female figures who are transformed, forthcoming from Farrar, Straus & Giroux this fall. She spent most of her twenties working at the alternative newsweekly the Boston Phoenix, most of her thirties working as a carpenter, and she writes the New England literary news column for the Boston Globe. She lives in Cambridge.

Roz Chast & Patricia Marx

Why Don't You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?: A Mother's Suggestions

Get tickets to see Roz Chast (author of New York Times bestseller and 2014 National Book Award Finalist, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?), and New Yorker writer Patricia Marx discuss their new book!  »

The perfect Mother’s Day gift: A collection of witty one-line advice New Yorker writer Patricia Marx heard from her mother, accompanied by full-color illustrations by New Yorker staff cartoonist Roz Chast.

Roz Chast was born in Brooklyn and now lives in Connecticut. Her cartoons have appeared in countless magazines, and she is the author of many books, including The Party, After You Left.

Patricia Marx has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1989. She is a former writer for “Saturday Night Live” and “Rugrats,” and the author of several books. Marx was the first woman elected to the Harvard Lampoon. She has taught screenwriting and humor writing at Princeton, New York University, and Stonybrook University. She was the recipient of a 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship.

Ali Liebegott

The Summer of Dead Birds

In this chronicle of mourning and survival, Ali Liebegott wallows in loneliness and over-assigns meaning to everyday circumstance, clinging to an aging dog and obsessing over dead birds. But these unpretentious vignettes are laced with compassion, as she learns to balance the sting of death with the tender strangeness of life.

Ali Liebegott has published three books: The Beautifully Worthless, The IHOP Papers, and Cha-Ching! She is the recipient of two Lambda Literary Awards and a Ferro-Grumley Award. She currently lives in Los Angeles and writes for the Emmy Award-winning show Transparent.

Lori Gottlieb in conversation with Amy Cuddy

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed

One day, Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who helps patients in her Los Angeles practice. The next, a crisis causes her world to come crashing down. Enter Wendell, the quirky but seasoned therapist in whose office she suddenly lands. As Gottlieb explores the inner chambers of her patients’ lives—a self-absorbed Hollywood producer, a young newlywed diagnosed with a terminal illness, a senior citizen threatening to end her life on her birthday if nothing gets better, and a twenty-something who can’t stop hooking up with the wrong guys—she finds that the questions they are struggling with are the very ones she is now bringing to Wendell: about desire and need, guilt and redemption, meaning and mortality, loneliness and love.  »
Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and New York Times bestselling author who writes the weekly “Dear Therapist” advice column for the Atlantic. A contributing editor for the Atlantic, she also writes for the New York Times Magazine, and is a sought-after expert on relationships, parenting, and hot-button mental health topics in media such as The Today ShowGood Morning AmericaCBS This MorningDr. Phil, CNN, and NPR. She lives in Los Angeles.

Kim Chaffee and Ellen Rooney

Her Fearless Run: Kathrine Switzer’s Historic Boston Marathon

Kathrine Switzer changed the world of running. This narrative biography follows Kathrine from running laps as a girl in her backyard to becoming the first woman to run the Boston Marathon with official race numbers in 1967. Her inspirational true story is for anyone willing to challenge the rules.

Kim Chaffee, a life-long New Englander and debut author, is a former second-grade teacher now focusing on writing and being a mom.

Ellen Rooney grew up watching the Boston Marathon and now spends her time as an illustrator and designer.

Nakia Hill

Editor Nakia Hill and contributors celebrate I Still Did It: Stories of Resilience, an intergenerational anthology featuring stories written by girls and women of color ages ten to eighty-eight in Boston.

Nakia Hill is an editor, poet, and manager of 826 Boston’s Writers’ Room program, supporting K-12 teachers and students. In 2018 she was named one of seven Boston Artists-in-Residence by Mayor Marty Walsh. As an editor she explores how to influence policy with art, and collaborates with local government and creatives in the city. Her poetry focuses on the use of writing as a tool for healing and resistance.

Brookline High School Poetry Fest

Local teens showcase their literary talents! Join Brookline’s up-and-coming poets for a night of the spoken word.

Meredith May

The Honey Bus: A Memoir of Loss, Courage and a Girl Saved by Bees

This event will take place at the Coolidge Corner location of the Public Library of Brookline.

An extraordinary story of a girl, her grandfather and one of nature’s most mysterious and beguiling creatures: the honeybee. Meredith May recalls the first time a honeybee crawled on her arm. She was five years old, her parents had recently split and suddenly she found herself in the care of her grandfather, an eccentric beekeeper who made honey in a rusty old military bus in the yard. In that moment she discovered that everything she needed to know about life and family was right before her eyes, in the secret world of bees.

Part memoir, part beekeeping odyssey, The Honey Bus is an unforgettable story about finding home in the most unusual of places, and how a tiny, little-understood insect could save a life.

Miriam Toews in conversation with Paul Yoon

Women Talking

Miriam will appear in conversation with Paul Yoon, author of Once the Shore and The Mountain.

One evening, eight Mennonite women climb into a hay loft to conduct a secret meeting. For the past two years, each of these women, and more than a hundred other girls in their colony, has been repeatedly violated in the night by demons coming to punish them for their sins. Now that the women have learned they were in fact drugged and attacked by a group of men from their own community, they are determined to protect themselves and their daughters from future harm. While the men of the colony are off in the city, attempting to raise enough money to bail out the rapists and bring them home, these women–all illiterate, without any knowledge of the world outside their community and unable even to speak the language of the country they live in–have very little time to make a choice: Should they stay in the only world they’ve ever known or should they dare to escape?

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Miriam Toews is the author of six previous bestselling novels: All My Puny SorrowsSummer of My Amazing LuckA Boy of Good BreedingA Complicated KindnessThe Flying Troutmans, and Irma Voth, and one work of nonfiction, Swing Low: A Life. She is winner of the Governor General’s Award for Fiction, the Libris Award for Fiction Book of the Year, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and the Writers’ Trust Engel/Findley Award. She lives in Toronto.

Paul Yoon is the author of Once the Shore, which was a New York Times Notable Book and Snow Hunters, which won the Young Lions Fiction Award. His most recent book, The Mountain, was a National Public Radio Best Book of the Year. He lives in Cambridge with his wife, the fiction writer Laura van den Berg and their dog. A new novel, Run Me to Earth, is forthcoming from Simon & Schuster.

Brookline Booksmith Book Club

The Friend

Discussing The Friend by Sigrid Nunez.

The Brookline Booksmith Book Club meets downstairs at 7:30pm. To contact our moderator, email bookclub@brooklinebooksmith.com.

Ana Luisa Amaral and translator Margaret Jull Costa

What's in a Name

With the elliptical looping of a butterfly alighting on one’s sleeve, the poems of Ana Luisa Amaral arrive as small hypnotic miracles. Spare and beautiful in a way reminiscent both of Szymborska and of Emily Dickinson (it comes as no surprise that Amaral is the leading Portuguese translator of Dickinson), these poems–in Margaret Jull Costa’s gorgeous English versions–seamlessly interweave the everyday with the dreamlike and ask “What’s in a name?”  »

Ana Luisa Amaral was born in Lisbon, in 1956, and lives in Leça da Palmeira. She has written poetry, plays, children’s books, books of essays and a novel. She has translated poets such as Emily Dickinson, John Updike or William Shakespeare. Her books have been published in several countries, such as the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Italy, France, The Netherlands, Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico or the United States. She has received various prizes and awards, and her name has twice been put forward for the Premio Reina Sofia. She taught for many years at the University of Porto, from which she received her Ph.D. on Emily Dickinson, and where her academic research centered around Comparative Poetics, Feminist Studies and Queer Theory. She currently co-hosts a weekly radio program on national radio on poetry, O som que os versos fazem ao abrir.

Margaret Jull Costa has been a literary translator for nearly thirty years and has translated many novels and short stories by Portuguese, Spanish, and Latin American writers, including Javier Marías, Fernando Pessoa, José Saramago, Bernardo Atxaga, and Ramón del Valle-Inclán. She received the 2008 PEN Book-of-the-Month Translation Award, the Oxford Weidenfeld Translation Prize for her version of Eça de Queiroz’s masterpiece The Maias, the 2012 Calouste Gulbenkian Prize for The Word Tree by Teolinda Gersão (Dedalus Books), and The 2015 Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize in Translation for Diary of the Fall by Michel Laub.

Independent Bookstore Day!

Come join us for Brookline Booksmith’s celebration of the 5th annual Independent Bookstore Day!

We are so excited to celebrate the magic of independent bookstores with our wonderful community, and are planning a fun-filled day of literary costume contests, photo booths, used book fishing, and more! Stay tuned on social media for more Independent Bookstore Day announcements.

Get more information on IBD festivities throughout the greater Boston area HERE!

Adam Rubin

High Five

From the creators of the New York Times bestseller Dragons Love Tacos comes a rollicking, rhyme-tastic, interactive high five competition–starring YOU!

Discover the lost art of the high five and improve your slapping skills just in time for the annual high five contest! From hand-limbering stretches to lessons on five-ing with finesse, readers are guided through a series of interactive challenges, each goofier than the next.

Adam Rubin is the New York Times best-selling author of a half dozen critically acclaimed picture books, including Dragons Love Tacos, Dragons Love Tacos 2: The Sequel, Secret Pizza Party, and Robo-Sauce. He spent ten years working as a creative director in the advertising industry before leaving his day job to write full-time. Adam has a keen interest in improv comedy, camping, and magic tricks.

Click here for Tickets

Adam Savage in conversation with Randall Munroe

Every Tool's a Hammer: Life Is What You Make It

MythBusters’ Adam Savage—author, Discovery Channel star and one of the most beloved figures in science and tech—celebrates the release of Every Tool’s a Hammer: Life Is What You Make It. Attendees will receive a FREE autographed copy of Savage’s new book.

Adam Savage is a maker. From Chewbacca’s bandolier to a thousand-shot Nerf gun, he has built thousands of spectacular projects as a special effects artist and the co-host of MythBusters. He is also an educator, passionate about instilling the principles of making in the next generation of inventors and inspiring them to turn their curiosity into creation.

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In his practical and passionate new guide Every Tool’s a Hammer, Adam weaves together vivid personal stories, original sketches and photographs from some of his most memorable projects, and interviews with many of his iconic and visionary friends in the arts and sciences—including Pixar director Andrew Stanton, Nick Offerman, Oscar-winner Guillermo Del Toro, artist Tom Sachs, and chef Traci Des Jardins—to demonstrate the many lessons he has picked up from a lifetime of making.

Randy Susan Meyers

Waisted

In this provocative, wildly entertaining, and compelling novel, seven women enrolled in an extreme weight loss documentary discover self-love and sisterhood as they enact a daring revenge against the exploitative filmmakers.

Randy Susan Meyers is the bestselling author of Accidents of Marriage, The Comfort of Lies, The Murderer’s Daughters, and The Widow of Wall Street. Her books have twice been finalists for the Mass Book Award and named “Must Read Books” by the Massachusetts Center for the Book. She lives with her husband in Boston, where she teaches writing at the Grub Street Writers’ Center.

Erica Ferencik

Into the Jungle

In this pulse-pounding thriller from the author of the “haunting, twisting thrill ride” (Megan Miranda, New York Times bestselling author) The River at Night, a young woman leaves behind everything she knows to take on the Bolivian jungle, but her excursion abroad quickly turns into a fight for her life.

Erica Ferencik is a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing at Boston University. Her work has appeared in Salon and The Boston Globe, as well as on National Public Radio. Find out more on her website EricaFerencik.com and follow her on Twitter @EricaFerencik.

Matt McCarthy

Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic

New York Times bestselling author shares this exhilarating story of cutting-edge science and the race against the clock to find new treatments in the fight against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as superbugs.

Physician, researcher, and ethics professor Matt McCarthy is on the front lines of a groundbreaking clinical trial testing a new antibiotic to fight lethal superbugs, bacteria that have built up resistance to the life-saving drugs in our rapidly dwindling arsenal. This trial serves as the backdrop for the compulsively readable Superbugs, and the results will impact nothing less than the future of humanity.

MATT MCCARTHY is the author of two national bestsellers, The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly and Odd Man Out. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell and a staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he serves on the Ethics Committee. His work has appeared in Sports IllustratedSlateThe New England Journal of Medicine, and Deadspin. He reviews nonfiction for USA Today and is editor-in-chief of Current Fungal Infection Reports.

Sondra Helene

Appearances

Samantha–the fashionable wife of a successful businessman and doting mother of one–struggles to negotiate the spheres of intimacy between her husband and her family of origin. Samantha loves her husband, Richard, and she loves her sister, Elizabeth. But the two of them can barely exist in the same room, which has caused the entire family years of emotional distress. Yet it’s not until Samantha’s sister is diagnosed at age forty-three with lung cancer that her family and her marriage are tipped into full-blown crisis.

Sondra Helene is a board member and writer at GrubStreet, Boston’s center for literary life. Her publications include “Jewish Magic Protected My Sister” in Lilith Magazine, “The Switch” in Voices of Caregiving: Stories of Courage, Comfort and Strength; and “Losing My Sister and the Long Road Back” on better50.com. She has studied fiction and nonfiction at GrubStreet, the Fine Arts Work Center, Gotham Writers Workshop, the Sirenland Writers Conference, and Kripalu.

Chris Van Dusen

A Piglet Named Mercy

Every porcine wonder was once a piglet! Celebrate the joy of a new arrival with this endearing picture-book prequel to the New York Times best-selling Mercy Watson series.

Mr. Watson and Mrs. Watson live ordinary lives. Sometimes their lives feel a bit too ordinary. Sometimes they wish something different would happen. And one day it does, when someone unpredictable finds her way to their front door. In a delightful origin story for the star of the Mercy Watson series, a tiny piglet brings love (and chaos) to Deckawoo Drive — and the Watsons’ lives will never be the same.

Chris Van Dusen is the author-illustrator of many books for young readers, including The Circus Ship and Hattie & Hudson, and the illustrator of the Mercy Watson and Deckawoo Drive series. He lives in Maine.

Mar Ka

Be-Hooved

Mar Ka lives in and writes from the foothills of Alaska’s Chugach Mountains. Be-Hooved, her new poetry collection, creates a layered spiritual memoir of her decades in the northern wilderness. The poems inhabit her surroundings—structured along the seasons and the migration patterns of the Porcupine Caribou Herd—and are wrought with a fine and luminous language.

Mar Ka is an indigenous rights attorney in the foothills of Alaska’s Chugach Mountains. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities grant and the Midnight Sun Poetry Prize. Her poems have been published in national and international journals and anthologies.

Neal Stephenson

Fall; or, Dodge in Hell

Meet Neal Stephenson and celebrate the publication of his newest book, FALL; OR, DODGE IN HELL. This event will be comprised of a reading and Q&A, followed by a signing. A ticket is required for attendance, and includes a copy of the book.

One beautiful autumn day, while Richard “Dodge” Forthrast undergoes a routine medical procedure, something goes irrevocably wrong. Dodge is pronounced brain dead and put on life support. Dodge’s family has his brain scanned and its data structures uploaded and stored in the cloud, until it can eventually be revived. In the coming years, technology allows Dodge’s brain to be turned back on. An eternal afterlife—the Bitworld—is created, in which humans continue to exist as digital souls. But this brave new immortal world is not the Utopia it might first seem …

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Neal Stephenson is the bestselling author of the novels ReamdeAnathemThe System of the WorldThe ConfusionQuicksilverCryptonomiconThe Diamond AgeSnow Crash, and Zodiac, and the groundbreaking nonfiction work In the Beginning … Was the Command Line. He lives in Seattle, Washington.

September

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Edwin Hill

The Missing Ones

Hester Thursby has given up using her research skills to trace people who don’t want to be found. A traumatic case a few months ago unearthed a string of violent crimes, and left Hester riddled with self-doubt and guilt. Caring for a four-year-old is responsibility enough in a world filled with terrors Hester never could have imagined before.

This follow-up to Edwin Hill’s debut Little Comfort is an intimate, intricate mystery as smart and complex as it is riveting.

Edwin Hill lives in Boston with his partner, Michael, and his favorite reviewer, their dog Edith Ann, who likes his first drafts enough to eat them. Visit him on the web at edwin-hill.com.

Kate Wisel

Driving in Cars with Homeless Men

Driving in Cars with Homeless Men is a love letter to women moving through violence. These linked stories are set in the streets and the bars, the old homes, the tiny apartments, and the landscape of a working-class Boston.

Serena, Frankie, Raffa, and Nat collide and break apart like pool balls to come back together in an imagined post-divorce future. Homeless Men is the collective story of women whose lives careen back into the past, to the places where pain lurks and haunts. With riotous energy and rage, they run towards the future in the hopes of untangling themselves from failure to succeed and fail again.

Kate Wisel is a native of Boston. Her fiction, nonfiction, and poetry has appeared, or is forthcoming, in publications that include Gulf Coast, New Ohio Review, Tin House online, Redivider as winner of the Beacon Street prize, and on the Boston subway as winner of the “Poetry on the T” contest. She currently lives in Madison, where she is a fiction fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.